One day at a time: daily manna

Commenting upon God’s provision of daily manna Ed Welch writes:

“Control freaks and worriers are being told that the challenges of life are ordained by the Father and King. They are neither random nor accidental…The tests follow a particular pattern: God will give us what we need for today and today alone.

No mystery here, it is all spelled out…”Take as much as you want, but don’t keep a crumb for tomorrow”. In various forms, this will become God’s plan for human life. You will encounter it again when Jesus trains his disciples and sends them out on a missionary journey with no extra supplies (Mark 6:7-9). The plan of course, is genius. Dump a year’s supply of manna into cold storage and, guaranteed, you will forget God until the supply disappears. Such prosperity would be a curse. God’s strategy is to give us enough for today and then, when tomorrow comes, to give us enough for that day too.

Do you see how this is exactly what we need? Fears and worries live in the future, trying to assure a good outcome in a potentially hard situation. The last thing they want to do is trust anyone, God included. To thwart this tendency toward independence, God only gives us what we need when we need it. The emerging idea is that he wants us to trust him in the future rather than our self-protective plans.”

(Running Scared, p.77)

God’s good design

I came across this 10 minute talk a few years ago but have come back to it recently.

Disability and the world around us can tell us lies; God always tells us truth.  Here is a wonderful Christian sister, Krista Horning, teaching herself and us God’s truth to conquer the lies.

 

 

 

A strange freedom

You can read a striking article here by Katherine Wolf about her experience of a stroke and her reflections, as a former beauty queen, on the beauty of brokenness.

I think she’s putting her finger on something that’s worth exploring. All humans experience brokenness as we live in this sin-broken world but we try to keep it hidden ‘backstage’ in our lives.  The ‘front stage’ we present often looks pretty together.

Disability changes that.  Suddenly we find that the front stage of our lives is visibly broken. We live with a public brokenness that others relate to us through.

Of course, that is harder in many ways.

Nonetheless, Katherine Wolf is saying there’s a strange freedom in that; we don’t have to pretend anymore.  The front-stage brokenness and the back-stage brokenness can now be joined up and lived as a bit more of an integrated whole.

Not what we might have chosen, but it opens up the possibility of a strange freedom all the same.

Maybe we can be a blessing to others through this.